What It Means To Be Highly Qualified

October 2010 We want so much from our teachers. To be well trained in educational best practice. To know the subjects they teach and be full of enthusiasm to share that knowledge. To be good at sharing that knowledge, lighting the thirst for more. To be excellent classroom managers, too, of course, as well as behavior experts in their own right. Not a job most of us could take on. This webpage focuses on what it means to be a highly qualified … [Read more...]

IDEA’s Definition of “Highly Qualified”

Updated October 2010 Special education teachers must now be highly qualified, says the 2004 reauthorization of IDEA, which has modeled its new HQT requirements on those found in its sister general education law, No Child Left Behind (NCLB). To be considered a highly qualified special education teacher depends on what type of special educator a person is. Different meanings apply depending on whether the teacher is a “highly qualified” special … [Read more...]

Understanding NCLB and What It Means for Children with Disabilities

Updated, January 2011 Links corrected, April 2013NICHCY is pleased to connect you with summaries of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, with a special section on how its provisions impact the education of students with disabilities.The law emphasizes assessment and accountability, and requires states to show Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in raising student achievement. The participation of students with disabilities in large-scale statewide or districtwide … [Read more...]

Module 7: Highly Qualified Teachers

by Marion Morton Crayton Office of Special Education Programs U.S. Department of Education In Partnership with... NICHCY, the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities August 2007 English only slideshow Handouts for Participants in both English and Spanish Module 7 takes an indepth look at a new element in IDEA: its definition of "highly qualified teacher." State educational agencies (SEAs), local educational … [Read more...]

NOTICE: The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) is no longer in operation. Our funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) ended on September 30, 2013. Our website and all its free resources will remain available until September 30, 2014.